Interview With Chuck Wissmiller of Family Plots


[img align=right]http://www.realityshack.com/pics/chuck.jpg[/img]
by aurora

If you’ve been watching Family Plots on A&E, you can’t help but love Chuck, the father of Shonna, Melissa, and Emily. His tough boxer exterior gives way to a softer, emotional side which is very endearing. Here’s what he had to say about his family, the show, and his job.

[b]Hi Chuck, thanks for taking some time out to answer our questions! We’re really enjoying the show! What was your greatest personal moment as a boxer?[/b]

I had one great moment as an amateur boxer and one as a pro. The first was in 1960 and I was a middleweight representing Detroit. I was sent to Louisville, Kentucky to box in the Eastern Olympic Regional Trials of 1960. I met Cassius Clay a.k.a. Mohammad Ali (probably THE classiest boxer I have ever seen before or since). The other moment was as a pro fighter in 1965 in the light middleweight championships and I fought Art Hernandez who was ranked #4 in the world and I went the distance and lost on a split decision. Six weeks later he went on to fight the great Sugar Ray and won!

[b]How did you make the transition from boxing to the funeral home?[/b]

I retired from the ring in 1966. I started in the funeral business 40 years later and because of my life’s experience I was able to understand what I was doing and why.

[b]Is it uncomfortable at all for you to be working so closely with your daughters and future son-in-law?[/b]

Sometimes my daughters drive me crazy, but most of the time I enjoy being around them. I really wouldn’t want it any other way.

[b]Do you watch Family Plots on television? If so, what do you think of it?[/b]

Of course I watch our show. The best part about my family is we can laugh at ourselves. I crack up when I watch our interactions with each other.

[b]What are the best and worst aspects of your job?[/b]

The best part of my job is that I am able to care for the poor families that have just suffered the worst loss that one can ever experience – the death of a loved one. The worst part of my job is that I have to get up early in the morning. I hate getting up early. I am not a “morning person”.

[b]Has your romantic life picked up at all as a result of being on television?[/b]

I’ve received tons of letters and offers of dates. One of these days I will get a chance and answer all of the letters, and who knows? I may get lucky and find someone.

[b]You’ve been portrayed several times as someone who has a big heart underneath a rough exterior. Does that make your line of work much more difficult for you, or can you actually become used to dealing with grief?[/b]

I will never get used to grief or witnessing families that have just suffered a death. I can only do the best that I can do for people and each funeral that I direct gives me an opportunity to try to assist a grieving family by letting them know that my heart aches for them and that I really do care.

[b]What, if anything, would you like fans of the show to know about you that might not come across very well on television?[/b]

I don’t know, faults and all, I am pretty much “what you see is what you get”. I’ve never tried to pretend to be somebody I’m not.

[b]Thanks very much for answering our questions Chuck – best of luck to you in the future![/b]