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Freelance entertainment writer, martial arts instructor, and mother of two.

So You Think You Can Dance, May 30th – With a Hiccup and a Wink


As Colin dances, his pants keep nearly falling off, and he’s still … just as much out there. Nigel tells him he’s not sure if we should come to his planet, or if he should come to theirs. Wade says he needs to wake up out of his hypnosis. The routine might work for a rave club at three or four in the morning, but it stops there. Mary tells him he’s just in his own world up there and there was really no performance. When the music changes and was really pumping, he was still “floating.” She was just afraid he was going to lose his pants and moon her. Nigel asks him why he chose that form of dance, and he says he feels free. He hopes to catch someone and make them smile. Nigel says he’s not right for the competition, but he thanks him for bringing the dance to them. Next year, Colin plans on bringing on ballroom dancing and lifting them up in the air and throwing them around. The thing is, I really don’t think this is a put-on.

Olivia Usey, 18, of Santa Clarita, California has been dancing since she was 18 months old in her mom’s dance studio, and her first time onstage was in a diaper. Her mom explains at 16 she really had bad skin problems and was put on a medicine that made her really sick with an infected liver that affected her cholesterol. She quit dancing and it broke her mother’s heart. Her mother has now found a lump in her breast, and when Olivia found out she asked what she could do. The answer was to audition for So You Th ink You Can Dance. When she’s at her first audition, her mom tells us, she’ll be having her breast biopsy.

It’s so hard for Olivia to dance now, but says she’s doing it for her mom, so that she can see her onstage one last time. She does a ballet routine to I Believe, and it’s truly inspiring, but definitely needs some work. Nigel tells her he thought she danced very nicely, yet there were a number of points where she fell off, yet she managed to regain her center on the pirouette. Mary saw some really great qualities, yet so many things Olivia were doing were either over-danced or she was really struggling. She can tell, though, that she’s really fighting and really wants this. Through tears, Olivia explains she hasn’t danced for three years because of her illness and couldn’t take classes. Mary, beginning to get emotional, tells her not to get her going. Wade tells her she is a great mover, and she has nothing to worry about not being able to go to classes. She’s a bit shaky, but a great dancer. Nigel suggests she pick up her confidence and return for the choreography round. I imagine the bit with her mom was filmed in between the first round and when she actually got in to see the judges, if this works like it does for American Idol.

Bryce “Gold Inferno” Cleverly, 21, of Los Angeles, California says he is the American Jump Style Champion and Cat asks if we could please see his face under the gold mask, but he doesn’t think so. He’s wearing what looks like a gold power ranger mask and a gold tie. He thinks it’s time to move into a different direction on the show, and that’s by not seeing his face. The dance looks like nothing but stomping. Wade asks him to explain the outfit, and he says he wears the mask when he dances, prompting Nigel to suggest it’s so no one will recognize him in the street and laugh at him. Weren’t you not wanting to be mean, Nigel?

Gold Inferno is one of the few Americans that does this dance style that originated in Belgium. He and a friend discovered it on videos online of people doing it in Holland. He was bad at first, but now he’s the champion. Nigel asks why he’s wearing a tie, and he then admits the title of champion is self-declared. Nigel is concerned about him, but allows him to come back for the choreography, suggesting he’s as crazy as Gold Inferno is, yet he is feeling he could end up winning. He still won’t take the mask off. Mary can’t stop laughing long enough to offer her critique, and Wade says he’s along for the ride to see what happens. Mary then manages to ask if they have lost their minds. I think that happened back with Colin.

Amanda Vivona, 18, of Pomona, California has been dancing since she was 3 years old and while everyone says it, she really can do it. She’s doing hip hop with a little ballet today. She is just not that good and keeps stopping and waiting to catch up to the beat. She even does a back bend at the end that doesn’t make it. She’s not anywhere close to where Olivia is. Nigel says he’s not sure what she is doing, and she admits she froze or blanked out. He reminds her he asked everyone at the beginning of the day if they believe they are as good as the dancers they have on the show, and she still says she thinks she is. He tells her she was lying to herself and suggests she find something useful to do with her life, as she won’t be a professional dancer. Mary says it just wasn’t really good at all, and Wade says it wasn’t really close to the level of what she’s seen on the show. Amanda says she trained for fifteen years but stopped a couple of years ago. Nigel suggests she stop again.


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